Steve Smith, Director, California Department of Industrial Relations:
You're about to see a documentary on opportunity. California's apprenticeship programs provide the chance for thousands of young people to expand their career opportunities and become well-paid, productive employees. At the same time, the business community sees the apprenticeship programs as a source for trained workers, workers that are critical to keeping California's economy strong. By partnering government, education, industry and labor, apprenticeship programs provide training that guarantee you a great future in virually any line of work. So whether you are an employer in search of skilled labor, or a young person in search of skills, I urge you to consider apprenticeship as a real option for a rewarding future.

Henry Nun, Chief, Division of Apprenticeship Standards DAS
The Division of Apprenticeship Standards certifies programs that meet exacting requirements as set by the California Apprenticeship Council. By working with educators, employers and labor unions we strive to ensure that the programs we certify provide the highest quality in education and training. The people you are about to meet have each participated in a certified apprenticeship program. As they share their stories, I'm sure you will share in their excitement and come to understand apprenticeship and its rewards for both California businesses and labor.

Title Sequence:

(screen)

California State Department of Industrial Relations presents
Apprenticeship, California's Best Kept Secret.

Narrator (Edward James Olmos):
The California apprenticeship training system is a unique partnership of industry, education and government. Industry funded, and industry driven, apprenticeship training provides an effective balance between classroom instruction and learning by doing, developing workers with marketable skills.

John Duncan, Former Director, Dept. of Industrial Relations:
Well there are some careers that there's just a shortage of qualified and trained individuals and there's exploding new industries every day.

Jim Young, President, Industrial Solutions:
The apprentice program is made up of two components one, it's training in the classroom of what we call theory, and the other is on the job training which uses the skills that their learning in the classroom actually on the job.

Rick Rice, Former Deputy Director, Department of Industrial Relations:
An apprenticeship program is, first and foremost, a partnership between the business community, the educational community and the State of California which certifies the program.

George A. Moton, Member, California Apprenticeship Council:
Generally a program will be three, anywhere from one to five years.

John Duncan, Former Director, Department of Industrial Relations:
There's something being invented right now but there needs to be a trained workforce that knows how to do that.

(Scrolling Supertitle: "Over 800 Occupations")

L&P Machines, Inc, Santa Clara

Apprenice Jeremy Pigula:
Right now I'm learning a lot of different machines a lot of vertical milling machines, a lot of stuff people haven't seen but since I have the privilege of working here I see all that already. It's a lot harder than I thought it would be, but it also forced me to push myself. And now I'm better off because of that.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Learning On The Job)

Geno Mercado, Apprenticeship Graduate
It was four long years but in the long run it benefited me cause now that I went through the four years and I've graduated I have a journeyman's card to help me out in the future and to pursue other work or open my own shop up some day.

Apprentice Jermaine Serrano:
This is my second year, I've learned a lot, and now I'm thinking yeah, this is going to benefit me more, you know, long term.

Apprentice on Machine Shop Floor:
Yeah and now I'm just waiting myself to move on to bigger machines.

Jeremy Pigula:
You know there's a lot of math that's pretty involved, and just because you run the machine, doesn't mean you can program the machine and really understand the machine, and that's what we're getting more in depth with. That and just the experience and the knowledge, and you know knowledge is power, that's the key.

Apprenticeship means a lot to me. Without this program, people like myself probably wouldn't be here. It's given me a stepping stone to a better career, at the same time, it's enabled me to support my family which is what I was looking for, and I just bought my house last year, just from the apprenticeship.

Jeremy Pigula:
Part of the classroom is actually learning the trade on the job. They can only tell you so much – where you really get the real experience is actually working in the shop itself you now and actually, you know, trial and error and doing things. You know, they show you the book work and then you apply it when you come here.

Narrator:
California leads the country with over 49,000 apprentices in more than 1,100 programs.

Solar Turbins Inc., San Diego

Lisa Reynolds, Corporate Communications:
Solar Turbins is the world's leading manufacturer of mid-range industrial gas turbines. It really is a win-win situation for everyone who's involved with this program.

Edward L. Fertig, Jr., Apprenticeship Graduate:
The schooling that you receive just can't be beat.

Vinod Arora, Manager of Experimental & Tooling:
We pay 100% for tuition and all related material.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Earn While You Learn)

Zeb Gilbert, Apprenticeship Graduate:
When I came in, right out of highschool I knew absolutely nothing. A lot of people took me under their wings, they showed me everything I needed to know.

Edward L. Fertig, Jr., Apprenticeship Graduate:
We're, ah, getting very skilled people, onto the floor where we need them

Zeb Gilbert, Apprenticeship Graduate:
They trained me the way they want me to be trained.

Vinod Arora, Manager of Experimental & Tooling:
It is the best kept secret in California, this apprenticeship program. We do need people whom we train – most of the people who were coming either were from the East Coast or Europeans. Gradually we realized the benefit to train our own people into these trades. Safety is the highest priority. We want to make sure that safety remains the highest priority.

Lisa Reynolds, Corporate Communications:
Once they've gone through this four year apprenticeship program, they really know our turbines inside and out.

Vinod Arora, Manager of Experimental & Tooling:
Once you have the journeyman card, you can go anywhere in the world.

Lisa Reynolds, Corporate Communications:
We hope that after this four year apprenticeship program it's a great stepping stone for them to launch a great career here at Solar.

Zeb Gilbert, Apprenticeship Graduate:
Great place to work and a great place to retire from as a career.

Vinod Arora, Manager of Experimental & Tooling:
I wish I were an apprentice, at an earlier age, because it's a great opportunity to earn while you are learning.

Narrator:
By partnering schools with the business community, students are offered a proven career training system, and businesses gain access to a workforce of motivated, energetic young people.

THE HON COMPANY (South Gate)

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
The Hon company is a producer of office furniture. We have two apprenticeship programs. Now we're currently working on adding our third one.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Benefits To The Company)

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
The payback to the company is just incredible. It so impressed me that I went back to our corporate headquarters and said that we're missing an opportunity here if we don't increase the level of apprentices that we can support with this program, so we doubled it. They're able to bring up-to date skills back into the workplace almost immediately.

Andrew S. Laeighton, Apprenticeship Graudate:
It means that I'm now a skilled die-maker, first and foremost.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
A skilled tool or die maker makes more than some of the managers in this same organization that we're in right now. The opportunities to keep that skill base rejuvenated, replenished and viable within California is absolutely essential to the health of the workforce.

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
The way I think that the state benefits from a program like this is that ah, more and more manufacturing companies will stay in California.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
The Hon company really cares about how well they do.

Thomas Weber, Apprentice:
They're putting a lot in me, to succeed in this program

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
We cover all tuition, fees, books, the whole shooting match.

Narrator:
Unlike most work experience programs, apprentices are paid, and the agreement with the employer is a commitment to continued training, and employment, upon the student's graduation.

Thomas Weber, Apprentice:
You're going to school to learn, your getting paid for it, your getting trained for it, and then you come out of it and you don't have to pay a dime. What more, what more can you ask for?

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
They have a real commitment to the program.

Thomas Weber, Apprentice:
We're going to learn a lot, you know, of the technology of tomorrow, and were going to help this company out with that.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
The payback is tremendous for both the employer and the employee.

(Supertitle: Creating A Program)

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
The way a company can create an apprenticeship is to start by talking with the state.

Bryan Goyette, Area Administrator, Division of Apprenticeship Standards:
The employer groups call us, or the educators call us, to find out how one gets started in or create an apprenticeship training program.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
You don't have to build this thing from scratch.

Bryan Goyette, Area Administrator, Division of Apprenticeship Standards:
We don't believe in re-inventing the wheel.

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
They can guide you in terms of what schools have programs already or what other companies have programs.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
Programs that can be that may stand alone and serve as the template for what you need to do or they can help you put one together that will serve your needs.

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
Then you need to interview different schools.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
…identify the particular teaching facility that's going to help you and be a partner with you.

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
…and selected a school that best met our needs.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
Get it "blessed" and certified and you're off and running.

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
…and then we also wanted our apprentices to have an AS degree.

Al Coble, General Manager, South Gate Facility:
…to round out their communication skills, their coping skills, and the other things that go with being able to be a very active and viable member of today's modern workforce.

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
It's becoming more and more difficult to find skilled employees. I personally benefit from the program as a human resource manager, because I'm the one that has to recruit for skilled maintenance and skilled tool and die makers.

Thomas Weber, Apprentice:
It's been a hell of an experience, I can't ask for any more, you know, I've had great training.

Teresa Montanez, Apprentice:
From the time I start working here, my life, everything, is changing for good.

Nancy S. Caron Human Resource manager:
Training, being a learning organization, is key to being an excellent company.

Teresa Montanez, Apprentice:
It's like learning to fly.

Narrator:
Employees, motivated by learning the skills in demand by employers, increase productivity

VI-TEC Manufacturing Inc (Livermore)

Jim Vice, President:
Companies always benefit. If you have a young person in the apprenticeship program he knows how to work, he knows how to handle the jobs that you give him, you teach him, and he's just a tremendous employee. Students that I've helped, and things like that, after two years they make you a lot of money.

Tim Vice, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I know when I went back to my highschool reunion I was a lot further ahead, in pay, the things that I had, than most of the people just coming out of college.

Jim Vice, President:
It's a program where these young people make a lot of money for themselves, but they, very very important, they make a lot of money for the company.

Tim Vice, Apprenticeship Graduate:
You go into it after highschool, you're out of your four year apprenticeship your considered now a journeyman after those four years.

Jim Vice, President:
How can you lose? It's a tremendous program.

I have a machine shop, but the time that I have is going to be machine shop apprenticeship programs. I am going to spend the rest of my life working on an apprenticeship program for the State of California.

Tim Vice, Apprenticeship Graduate:
We've build parts for the shuttle, we've built parts for all different industries. That, to me, that's a thrill.

Jim Vice, President:
They have a way of learning how to run jobs in the shops and some day a lot of them are going to become shop owners. I was an apprentice in 1968, and graduated four years later. I've never ever lost a job in machining. Never Ever. Nobody's ever asked me to take a day off. I've always been employed.

A/C Transit, Oakland

Bob Bithell Apprenticeship Coordinator, A/C Transit:
To go out and try to hire people who have all the qualifications of a journey-level mechanic is not that easy. We found out that the best way is to grow our own.

John Johnson, Apprenticeship Graduate:
…and it's a very interesting job – it's not the same every day.

(Scrolling Supertitle: A Skilled Work Force)

Bob Bithell Apprenticeship Coordinator, A/C Transit:
By us being more efficient, able to perform repairs more efficiently on the coaches, we're saving taxpayers money.

Marcellus Holmes, Apprentice:
I give them what they want, four hours work in production, to produce, to provide transportation for the community.

Bob Bithell Apprenticeship Coordinator, A/C Transit:
People can get to and from work, more reliably. It's a win-win situation all the way around.

Marcellus Holmes, Apprentice:
I'm benefiting from it, car, house, dog, wife, kids, you know.

Bob Bithell Apprenticeship Coordinator, A/C Transit:
We end up with a great employee.

John Johnson, Apprenticeship Graduate:
My apprenticeship – I love my apprenticeship.

Bob Bithell Apprenticeship Coordinator, A/C Transit:
Superior knowledge, and capabilities, and it also improves morale.

John Johnson, Apprenticeship Graduate:
And once you complete it and you get that card in your hand, it's a great feeling. You run around, as a mater of fact I think I ran around the shop, holding it up, laughing and jumping around.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Recruitment)

Narrator:
Apprenticeship training is cost-effective because it eliminates the need for expensive recruitment, creates a large, diverse, and flexible labor pool with desirable skills.

Fairway Molds Inc. (Walnut)

Joe Stark, Production Supervisor:
At the high school level, there's not the industrial arts training that there used to be, and there's numerous individuals that are well qualified to do this type of work. Yeah, I benefit because one of my responsibilities is to find the people to do the work, and if I can't find them I'm in trouble.

Juan Carlos Chacon, Apprentice:
California can actually benefit through just keeping the work in California, keeping Californians busy with work.

Joe Stark, Production Supervisor:
At the end of the four year program they will have made $236,000. whereas if you took the college option you could be spending as much as a hundred , two hundred thousand dollars.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Career Opportunities)

Narrator:
Because employees show high morale and loyalty when they participate in a program offering upward mobility and career development, apprenticeships reduce the cost of high turnover.

Walker Corporation (Ontario)

Bruce Walker, President:
There's a shortage of skilled help, and when you can't find good people, then you can't quote the work so the jobs move out of state... By participating in the program you're earning money, you're going to school and completing your education, and it can pave the way to higher career opportunities.

Henry Santibanez, Apprentice:
The first thing that caught my eye was that they offered training programs, and I never really had a chance to finish my high school education.

Bruce Walker, President:
We try to find people with good attitudes, who like to work with their hands.

Henry Santibanez, Apprentice:
I feel like I've been given a second chance, see I'm a little older now and I wasn't able, they didn't offer this at any other companies that I've worked for before.

Bruce Walker, President:
One of the biggest benefits would be reduced turnover.

Henry Santibanez, Apprentice:
If all goes well I may go in for an 8 year program, be a tool and die maker.

Bruce Walker, President:
There is a definite skill career path future for the employee.

Henry Santibanez, Apprentice:
Maybe run an EDM, maybe someday be an engineer.

Bruce Walker, President:
…and that's good for both of us.

Yvette Landgrave, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I'm an operator. I operate punch press machines.

Bruce Walker, President:
We're very proud of the women that are in our metal forming program. There's no barriers as far as "this is a man's job" or "this is a woman's job".

Yvette Landgrave, Apprenticeship Graduate:
Since I'm a single mom, I'm "mom" and "dad".

Bruce Walker, President:
And we're real proud of her , she's done a lot of good things for us.

Yvette Landgrave, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I know as time goes by the more I learn the more money I'll end up getting.

Erwin Dominguez, Apprentice:
I feel amazed at myself working in a company as big as Walker. It's like unbelievable, I can't believe it right now.

Bruce Walker, President:
Get people interested in careers in metal forming at the high school level. They can complete the classroom portion of that and then as they graduate move on into the workforce and seamlessly continue their eductation at the community college level.

Erwin Dominguez, Apprentice:
I always just thought I was going to work something small like a little food place, but not like this.

Henry Santibanez, Apprentice:
Hey look at me I'm 34 years old and I'm going to school. You know, there's always room for improvement – there's always room for improvement.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (Walnut Creek)

Sharon Burt, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I'm a distribution operator, we monitor and maintain the electric distribution system from this office. This is the nerve center so we try to keep the lights on.

(Scrolling Supertitle: A Stable Work Force)

Lesley Green, Apprenticeship Graduate:
We have to isolate the problem, find out what it is. I have worked for this company for a long time for almost twenty years, and I was able to get into this apprenticeship program and it was a big change in my life.

Sharon Burt, Apprenticeship Graduate:
The training was quite intense.

Lesley Green, Apprenticeship Graduate:
It made me start to think again.

Sharon Burt, Apprenticeship Graduate:
It was hit the books, definitely.

Lesley Green, Apprenticeship Graduate:
It became very overwhelming and you'd think, "am I going to get through this program?"

Sharon Burt, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I would be sitting at the table with my kids while they were doing their homework and I'd be doing mine and I hadn't done that for a while, so, I think it was good for them too.

Landis Marttila, Secretary, Joint Apprenticeship Committee:
I believe California benefits from the apprentice programs by essentially putting stability into a workforce.

Sharon Burt, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I have a good position here that would be mine for probably as long as I'd like to keep it.

Landis Marttila, Secretary, Joint Apprenticeship Committee:
I think it's a good company to work for. I think the jobs are fulfilling, I think they're challenging, and there's a future in them – it's not temporary employment.

Sharon Burt, Apprenticeship Graduate:
It's going to provide, you know, better for myself and my family, that I did go through the apprenticeship.

Landis Marttila, Secretary, Joint Apprenticeship Committee:
A decent wage and benefits package allows people to purchase a home, raise families, and participate in the greater economy.

Lesley Green, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I am so proud of my certificate I have it framed and hanging on the wall.

Sharon Burt, Apprenticeship Graduate:
And now I've gotten through the program, I'm on my way (laughs and smiles).

Sara Filice, Apprenticeship Graduate:
The apprenticeship program has really given me the opportunity to grow.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Breaking Down Barriers)

Sara Filice, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I'm not out in the field anymore. I was out in the field about 5 years, through the apprenticeship, and then they offered me a job doing electrical estimating. It is great! It's very challenging. It's a different world, it's again another world in the construction industry, but I love it. It's built me up and I am so appreciative of this program. I've really grown up. I've developed a lot of inner strength and confidence within myself. It's really kind of given me my own identity – I've become very self-sufficient. It's really kind of taken the question out of what my future holds for me – it's not so scarry. I'm the first female to have graduated through the five year program. We need women out in the field. It's a benefit to the industry, we have a lot to offer, and as far as I'm concerned we can do it just as well as the next guy. There is a big opportunity for us out there and we can do it. But you have to get over the stigma of the past. The past is the past. I'm not some exception to the rule here. If I can do it, just about anyone can.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Classroom Instruction)

Narrator:
Apprenticeship training is efficient because it uses available public school facilities for related classroom instruction.

Licensed Vocational Nursing Program (Redlands)

Ramona Radsik, Lead instructor, Redlands Adult School:
The apprenticeship program allows people who have been working in the field of nursing as a nursing assistant or a medical assistant to keep working in their jobs and to receive benefits of that work experience.

Valerie Cabra, Apprentice:
It's a program that's designed for people who want to work and continue their education at the same time.

Susan Knapp, Apprentice:
We have to work 32 hours a week at our regular jobs in the medical field, and we attend classes two to three days a week here, 8 hours a day.

Valerie Cabra, Apprentice:
There are some single parents in there and you have to work, and for me it's free. So I know some LVN students who pay $15,000 to get the same education that I'm getting.

Laura Resch, Apprentice:
There's no other place out there that I could be able to work and maintain my full-time status and all the insurance benefits that I need and further my education.

Ramona Radsik, Lead instructor, Redlands Adult School:
They are having the best of both worlds.

Tasha Inghram, Apprentice:
You're learning from the people you're working with and you're learning from the school.

Ramona Radsik, Lead instructor, Redlands Adult School:
I feel like the State is doing something smart with my money, as a tax payer.

Tasha Inghram, Apprentice:
Because, you're putting more people in the workforce.

Susan Knapp, Apprentice:
I'm more marketable, as an employee.

Valerie Cabra, Apprentice:
I've got a firm foundation and I'm going to move on from there.

Susan Knapp, Apprentice:
…and as a single parent, it's very important for me to make a little bit more money.

Ramona Radsik, Lead instructor, Redlands Adult School:
…and what I find too is that the self esteem of the student is very much improved.

Valerie Cabra, Apprentice:
Oh, I love it. I love class. I look forward to coming here (laughs and smiles).

Ramona Radsik, Lead instructor, Redlands Adult School:
…and normally people as they leave our program are not the same people that came in.

Narrator:
The signed apprenticeship agreement spells out the training to be provided by the employer and the school.

San Diego Trolley

(Scrolling Supertitle: No Experience Necessary)

Genevieve C. Coleman, Apprenticeship Graduate:
I used to be an apprentice, I went through the program, and now I'm an electromechanic, after putting in six years

(under vehicle) If we find the leak then we can repair it, if not, we have to continue to run the test until we find out what's going on with the system, why is it losing pressure.

The appreniceship program at the San Diego Trolley involves 4 to 6 years of education at any community college in this area. Also, you have on-the-job hours which you must complete in addition to working a regular 8 hour shift. So basically you're working into a 12 hour day.

Michael Gandy, Training Supervisor, San Diego Trolley:
The apprentices are full time employees, they actually perform the work as they're learning on-the-job. It takes a good 2 to 4 years to get a complete understanding of what's going on with these cars.

Genevieve C. Coleman, Apprenticeship Graduate:
It gives the company the opportunity to take some raw talent and train them into the point where they're more dependable, they're more reliable, they're more self-reliant.

Michael Gandy, Training Supervisor, San Diego Trolley:
We're starting to reap the rewards from the training program in regards to these people being able to function…

Genevieve C. Coleman, Apprenticeship Graduate:
(under Vehicle) Make sure our hoses are good, are fittings are good…check out your brake pads, make sure we don't run into any rotor problems… make sure the oil level is at the proper level…

A four year degree is not required. You can be a valuable functioning part of society without having to go to college. It gives you the opportunity to say that, yes, I'm giving back to my environment, I'm giving back to society, and feel valuable.

Mitchell Campbell, Chairman, Joint Apprenticeship Committee:
College is not for everyone, and, a lot of people like to work with their hands.

Genevieve C. Coleman, Apprenticeship Graduate:
It's hands-on. Anything you learn with the apprenticeship program, if you learn it in the classroom, then you come out to the shop area, onto the working floor, and you learn to apply it.

Michael Gandy, Training Supervisor, San Diego Trolley:
We don't require personnel, when they first start with the trolley, to have the background or experience. So, we're providing that for them.

Mitchell Campbell, Chairman, Joint Apprenticeship Committee:
You want to go underneath the car, you're going to grease the car, you're going to get dirty, but it's rewarding – you have the satisfaction of knowing that you work at San Diego Trolley, and you're the best in the world.

Genevieve C. Coleman, Apprenticeship Graduate:
It gives you confidence like you wouldn't believe to go through an apprenticeship program and to complete it. Cause if the governor of the State of California signed it, so it's got to be good (smiles).

Mitchell Campbell, Chairman, Joint Apprenticeship Committee:
You have the satisfaction of knowing that you troubleshooted a piece of equipment, and you repaired the equipment, and you put the equipment out to work. Start off as an apprentice and work your way up and just, you can write your own ticket.

Genevieve C. Coleman, Apprenticeship Graduate:
San Diego Trolley!

Solid State Inc.

Steve Hommel, Apprentice:
Probably learning a new trade is the best thing about the program. You have a pretty good chance at a life-long job, unlike what I did before, I was an aircraft painter. Well, there's not much demand for those anymore.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Learning a New Trade)

Jacki Hardman, Human Resources Manager, Solid State Inc.
Our workforce is becoming aged. The average age of a tool and die maker for example in this country is approximately 55. We're looking at the possibility that in the next 5 or 10 years we will not have the people in order to manufacture the parts that we all need.

Steve Hommel, Apprentice:
I'd recommend it to anybody that wants to get up out of that burger-world wage.

D & H Manufacturing, Fremont

Paul Harris, Production Planning, D & H Manufacturing:
It brough me from never being in a machine shop before, to running a hundred-man machine shop, to now planning all the jobs that run through a large machine shop like ours.

You look at yourself more as a professional than just a standard worker.

The State of California benefits by putting the people to work – they gain their tax dollars from people that are working, they're off the welfare rolls.

Bob Allen, Apprenticeship Graduate:
The way that I got into the apprenticeship is I worked for an electronics company for 20 years and was layed off.

Trung Nguyen, Apprentice:
This is a CNC lathe, this is the part that I'm making. I think I would recommend this apprenticeship to just about everyone.

(Scrolling Supertitle: Journeyman)

Terry Ruebel, Apprentice:
When I talk to people and tell them that I'm in the apprenticeship and that I'll be becoming a graduate for the journeyman, it gets me respect.

Bob Allen, Apprenticeship Graduate:
Being a journeyman, I can take my trade on the road – that's why they call it a journeyman.

Paul Redlin, Apprentice:
The industry would die without the apprenticeship program.

Terry Ruebel, Apprentice:
I have a lot of pride in what I've accomplished with that.

Paul Redlin, Apprentice:
Best thing I thought was I got to make a little steam engine for my dad. And you've got to remember that this came out of nothing so I got to mold all this, and cut all this, and make the dies and everything, and then you get to turn the thing on and it runs on steam. That's what I thought the best thing about the program is, making something out of nothing.

Narrator:
For more information about how to become an apprentice, or how to start an apprenticeship program, contact the offices listed on the screen:

(screen)

For Information Call
Division of Apprenticeship Standards (DAS)
Headquarters: San Francisco (415)703-4920
Fresno: (559)445-54431
Los Angeles: (213)576-7750

Or visit the appenticeship information website:

(Screen)

DIR Website
www.dir.ca.gov

(Screen)

We express our deep gratitutde to the Division of Apprenticeship Standards and the California Apprenticeship Council for their generous support.
We also give as pecial thanks to the companies and individuals that participated in the making of this video.

- The Producers

(Screen)

Executive Producer
Rick Rice

Producer
Alan Bloom

(Screen)

Directed by
Alan Bloom
Julian Gomez
Art Simon

Written by
Alan Bloom Rick Rice
Julian Gomez Robert Vianello

(Screen)

Director of Photography and Computer Graphics
Art Simon

Editor and Post Production Supervisor
Julain Gomez

(Screen)

Production Controller
Irene Stafford

Production Manager
Jin Shin

Associate Producer
Robert Vianello

(Screen)

Narrator
Edward James Olmos

Recording Engineer
Billy Savage

Bookkeeper
Cindy Bloom

(Screen)

Location Manager & Gaffer

Hasmik Oganesyan

Production Assistants
Alex Rostami
Joel Bloom

Music
Scooter Pietsch

(Screen)

Copyright 1998 DIR